Category Archives: General

Non-Profits That Assists the Elderly

How do we acknowledge the contributions older people have made and continue to make to our world? In 1963, President John F. Kennedy made May “Senior Citizens Month” the precursor to the current name “Older Americans Month.” In the month of May, the current president addresses the nation asking the citizens to pay tribute to the elderly in their communities. In honor of this request, Diversity Best Practices has made a list of key organizations that serve senior Americans.

AARP
AARP is the biggest organization for older Americans. Over half of AARP’s 35 million members over 50 are still working. The organization focuses on issues like wellness, health, economic security and employment. It provides many long-term resources and programs, like Ageline, a searchable online database having detailed summaries of publications for older adults. Also, AARP provides hundreds of books, journals, magazines, research reports and videos serving members of the older population.

The Administration on Aging (AOA)
The Administration on Aging is the federal agency devoted to planning and policy development and delivery of services for the elderly and their caregivers. This agency is devoted to policy development, planning and the delivery of supportive home-and community-based services to older persons and their caregivers. The AOA works with the National Aging Network of State and Area Agencies on Aging, Tribal and Native organizations and hundreds of adult care centers, caregivers, volunteers, and service providers.

Alzheimer’s Association
The Alzheimer’s Association is the largest and oldest national voluntary health organization committed to researching cures, causes, and prevention strategies of Alzheimer’s disease and offering education and support services to Alzheimer’s patients, their families and caregivers.

American Society on Aging (ASA)
The American Society on Aging is a national professional membership organization established in 1954. Its members include educators, practitioners, researchers and lay people working with and on behalf of the aging. It provides a huge variety of programs for continuing education and specialized training in aging. Also, it works at the national level to impact public policy.

Non-Profits That Are Always in Need of Volunteers (Part II)

Local Libraries
When I was a kid, I volunteered at my local library for a couple of hours a week for a school project. I enjoyed it so much that I ended up volunteering each week and developed a lifetime love of books, as well as an admiration for reading and learning. Libraries usually need help assisting patrons and organizing shelves. You may also help setting up and operating public events, like book fairs and author signings. Ask your local library if you can help create flyers or copy edit ads and put that on your resume.

Art Museums
If you’re artistic, working in a museum can be a valuable experience. You can surround yourself with eternal works of art, soaking up knowledge, and acquiring administrative skills all at the same time. Get involved in the community by volunteering for children’s activities and family programs at your local museum. Once you build up your knowledge base, you may be an event planner or tour guide.

Political Campaigns
If you’re passionate about politics, contemplate lending your support to a local candidate you feel right about. No politician gets into office without volunteers manning the phones, passing out fliers, doing fundraising, and answering emails. This kind of work can give you valuable experience on several levels and can be applied to a host of various industries. It can also help you get a network of contacts you can have if you are interested in a political career.

Retirement Homes
Retirees love an exhilarating new lecture to attend or a class to teach them something interesting and fun. So, be creative and get a program that shows off your skills. Ask to recite some famous historical speeches or to moderate a poetry and short story reading. If you’re good with computers, offer your services and teach senior citizens how to do basic or intermediate computer tasks. They probably want to learn, but no one has ever taken the time to offer them the right instruction.

Non-Profits That Are Always in Need of Volunteers (Part I)

There are lots of reasons to volunteer your time for a good cause. I do it because I believe in the work. While that’s enough for me, I certainly get a lot more out of it than I first expected. I have volunteered for most of my adult life rescuing dogs and helping in animal shelters. Besides this gratifying work, I’ve also learned public relations, copy editing, and wed design, all career skills that have strengthened my resume, making me more likely to be hired and turning me into a more efficient worker.

If you find yourself with some extra time on your hands, why not consider committing a couple of hours to community service and putting that extra shine on your resume? Who knows, you may discover a whole new set of talents to take you up a pay grade or two.

Animal Rescue Shelters
Local animal shelters always need volunteers. Improve your office skills by fielding phone calls, offering general administrative assistance, and responding to emails. Try to connect with the staff, such as offering your dog walking services to the pet owners-to-be who pass through. It makes for a super part-time job and could even become a full-time venture. Professional dog walkers could earn up to $50,000 a year. Perks like having the happiest clients and staying active are the best perks in the world are hard to beat.

National Parks
Volunteering at a national park is more than just picking up litter. If you’re a naturalist or history buff, you can seek opportunities to work at interesting historical sites sustained by the National Park Service. For example, if you’re in the NY area, check out the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historical Site. If you’re in CA, look at Alcatraz Island.

Food Pantries
Food pantries and soup kitchens can frequently use a helping hand organizing a local food drive, getting donations, or just handing out hot meals to those in need. Provide any skill you have, including data entry, cooking, or copy editing. Any are great values to any organization.

Need Help with Funeral Costs? Take a Look at These Charities

Coping with a death is never easy but financial worries can increase the difficulties in this heartbreaking circumstance.

Financial assistance is available to aid in paying for some or all the funeral or burial costs of a parent or loved one. The resources from charities and the government concentrate on the working poor, senior citizens, and low-income families who live on a limited income and lack assets. Others could qualify for help in paying for funeral costs when they are faced with a need.

Some counties and states could give direct financial aid for paying bills and other expenses that might be gained from a funeral. The government may offer other help as well, like free caskets for the poor, the indigent, and very low-income families. Or they may pay for transportation (out of state death) or cremation costs. Or, individuals can research services offered by the Funeral Consumers Alliance, which gives advice and help a family have an affordable and dignified service for their loved ones.

Non-profit advice and referrals for funerals

The Funeral Consumers Alliance is a nonprofit organization that offer families resources and educational materials on funeral choices. The organization covers all facets of burying a loved one, whether it is a child or parent. The organization can counsel individuals on affordable funeral choices that might be available to them. Additionally, the programs offered may help folks work out a service that meets their budget and fits their financial and personal situation.

However, a family’s own budget is the deciding factor in what someone can pay for a funeral or burial. An assessment of their assets will typically be done, varying from investments and savings to life insurance policies. The non-profit will aid clients in understanding the process and future costs.

Top Non-Profits for Homeless Veterans

The federal government has a goal of eradicating homelessness among veterans. Many nonprofit and government organizations have joined the effort to get to that goal.

Here are four nonprofits deemed standouts for their work in combating homelessness among U.S. veterans.

Disabled American Veterans (DAV)
Four-stars by Charity Navigator, the two million-member Disabled Americans Veterans (DAV) aids veterans lead high-quality lives with dignity and respect by making sure they and their families can access the complete range of benefits available to them based on the organization’s mission statement. Shown on the Department of Veterans Affairs’ alternative resources Web page, DAV also works to unite in-need service members with housing with its Homeless Veterans Initiative.

United States Veterans Initiative (U.S. VETS)
The Center for Public Integrity named U.S.VETS as one of the nation’s Top 25 veterans charities. The organization says its role is offering employment, counseling services, and housing to our nation’s veterans. The 11 U.S. VETS chapters work to get homeless veterans and guide them to vital services that might help ease the challenges they face as a consequence of their homelessness.

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV)
Shown significantly on the Department of Veterans Affairs’ alternative resources Web page, NCHV refers to itself as the most complete source of information about America’s homeless veterans. Its role is to offer research and technical resources to a nationwide network of organizations, non-profit and governmental that in turn give emergency and supportive housing, health services, job training, placement assistance, legal aid, case management support, and food to thousands of homeless veterans every year.

American Veterans (AMVETS)
Through its highly rated National Service Foundation, and with organizations like the above-mentioned NCHV, AMVETS offers grassroots programs like “Stand Down,” which aids homeless veterans get shelter refuge from the streets and start to get their lives together. Also, AMVETS works with the Department of Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans and is one of the non-governmental organizations suggested by the VA for addressing this crucial issue.

Charities that Help Pay Bills

Several charity foundations and organizations throughout the United States provide aid to people for paying their bills. These nonprofits frequently assist those in need by paying for needs like electric, rent, heating, and water as well as provide referrals to agencies that can give continuing assistance.

American Red Cross

The American Red Cross is possibly best known for its assistance of those in emergency situations and disasters like earthquakes and fires. However, local chapters of the American Red Cross also aid with emergency housing assistance and utility bills for those who are facing eviction or foreclosure. Services offered by the American Red Cross may differ by location and are based according to individual need.

The United Way

The United Way is a global nonprofit organization that assist in paying utilities bill by helping hundreds of people in need every day. The United Way gives support and aid to the needy in paying for things such as utilities, housing, child care, food and much more. Also, The United Way works with other charitable organizations to give ongoing assistance to those who need long-term care or counseling. United Way even help domestic violence victims to get out of a dangerous situation.

Catholic Charities USA

When it comes to using charities to aid in paying bills, Catholic Charities is a great place to go. The organization explicitly states that they are willing to help those is poverty regardless what religion they are. They have a long list of programs for those in need like disaster relief services, immigrant and refugee services, health and nutrition assistance, and housing assistance. Also, many local chapters are able to provide emergency assistance. These programs helps families that have suffered hospitalization, death of a loved one, or a job loss with groceries, paying utility bills, and medications.

Tips on Researching a Charity Before Donating

If you’re pondering a request for a donation to a charity, do your research before you give. By discovering as much as you can about the charity, you can avoid scammers who try to take advantage of your kindness. Here are tips to help guarantee your charitable contributions are used for its intention.

Signs of a Charity Scam

These days, non-profits and charities use the web, email, texts, and face-to-face to solicit and get money. Naturally, scammers use these same techniques to take advantage of your kindness.

It doesn’t matter how they come to you, avoid any charity or non-profit that:

  • Refuses to give detailed information about its costs, mission, identity and how the donation will be used.
  • Won’t offer proof that your contribution is tax deductible.
  • Uses a name that is very similar to that of a reputable, well-known organization.
  • Thank you for a pledge you don’t remember making.
  • Uses high-pressure strategies like trying to get you to donate right away without giving you time to do any research and/or think about it.
  • Asks you to wire money or to donate cash.
  • Wants to send an overnight delivery service or courier to collect the money ASAP.
  • Promise sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a donation. By law, you don’t have to give a donation to qualify to win a sweepstakes.

Charity Checklist

Take the following steps to make sure your donation helps the organizations and people you want to help.

  • Ask for in-depth information about the charity such as the name, address, and telephone number.
  • Get the exact name of the organization and research. Look up the name of the organization online, particularly with the word scam or complaint. This is one way to learn about its reputation.
  • Call the charity. Find out if the organization knows of the solicitation and has approved the use of its name. The organization’s development staff should be able to assist you.

Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide (ELAW)

www.elaw.org

ELAW (Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide) aid communities around the world in demanding clean water, clean air, and a healthy planet. They are a global alliance of scientists, lawyers, and other advocates working together across borders to encourage grassroots efforts to create a just, sustainable future.

ELAW activists, serving in their home countries, understand best how to protect the environment. By giving their partners the scientific and legal support needed, ELAW assists in challenging environmental abuses and forms a worldwide corps of skilled, dedicated activists working to safeguard ecosystems and communities for future generations.

Our strategy: Discovering passionate lawyers who are devoted to protecting the ecosystem in their home countries.

ELAW advocates play crucial roles in aiding communities go after environmental justice. They aid citizens with participating efficiently in decisions about the environment, confront environmental abuses, and administer environmental laws. They provide guides to citizen participation, school community paralegals to speak for community interests, and bring legal action to bring to an end the worst offenders. As businesses spread their reach around the globe, many communities deal with unjust issues.

These communities have to be able to speak out to safeguard their health, environment, and rights. Grassroots activists have a key role in aiding communities speak out and ELAW provides these activists the scientific and legal support needed to confront abuses and craft a viable future. ELAW finds the most dedicated environmental defenders and works with them to follow these initiatives to advance environmental justice.

Legal professionals around the globe call on ELAW for tools to enforce and support environmental laws. ELAW U.S. attorneys partner with local activists to evaluate proposed statutes, recreate model laws, and bring enforcement actions.

ELAW activists depend on ELAW staff members to analyze plans for planned developments, make systems to observe environmental settings, give professional testimony, and suggest cleaner alternatives.

GBS/CIDP Foundation International

www.gbs-cidp.org

The vision of GBS/CIDP Foundation International is that each individual affected by CIDP, GBS, or MMN has easy access to early and precise diagnosis, low-cost treatments and reliable support services.

The theory is that the body’s immune system, which usually protects itself, identifies myelin as unfamiliar and attacks it. Myelin is a vital part of the peripheral nervous system. It coats the nerve axon (the long, wire-like part of a nerve cell) similar to insulation covering an electrical wire. The nerves expand from the spinal cord to the rest of the body, arousing muscle contraction and spreading sensory information back to the nervous system from receptors in the joints and skin.

This myelin lets electrical impulses proficiently travel down the nerve axon. When myelin is removed or damaged, these electrical impulses are lost or slowed, and messages sent from the brain are interrupted and may never make it to their ending destination. What instigates this process is not yet clear.

Offering support to our community is utmost to our grass-roots mission. All volunteers have a relation to GBS, CIDP or variants via a personal journey or due to a loved one or family member. The Foundation knows how critical it is to get the care and support needed to live through these trying times. While we are not physicians, we do connect ourselves with some of the best doctors on the globe. Our Global Medical Advisory Board has made a pledge of support for our constituents and to make sure our patients have access to their resources via the Centers of Excellence.

We have local chapters everywhere on earth. Find the chapter nearest to you and bond with volunteers who have lived through a parallel journey. Ask for our printed literature and gain access to the current and most knowledgeable information.

Acadia Center

www.acadiacenter.org

Acadia Center works at the junction of climate change and energy, including transportation, land use, carbon emissions reduction, mitigation, consumer-side energy resources, and power generation.

Acadia Center keeps the big picture in plain sight while following targeted and thorough advocacy efforts across and within numerous economic sectors. This comprehensive approach is needed to having high-impact results. For instance, Acadia Center’s EnergyVision details how changes in many sectors could put the northeast region on track to reduce emissions by over 80% by 2050.

Acadia Center undertakes tests from several angles, with expertise and strategies that go across several disciplines. This method shows the difficulty of the issues and influences a range of skillsets and networks.

Energy efficiency is the cleanest and cheapest fuel. It produces big savings for consumers and is the basis to a sustainable, carbon-less energy future. By lessening need on the power grid, efficiency reduces the problem of shared infrastructure costs.

Acadia Center promotes and designs complementary policies and market-based strategies that encourage cleaner energy supplies in every sector.

Acadia Center spreads policies that level the playing field so renewable power can equally participate and thrive. Allocated energy resources like rooftop solar create clean energy while improving customer control over energy bills and decreasing the need for grid infrastructure and polluting power plants.

The Next Generation Solar Framework program offers a maintainable policy approach that compensates solar based on proven value, while confirming equitable payment for sustaining the grid.

RGGI has assisted Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern states lessen power plant emissions considerably while producing health and economic benefits in the region. This efficient model can and should be spread to other states, as well as cover additional sectors like heating fuels and transportation. Emissions reductions can also be accomplished by putting a price on pollution via a carbon fee that encourages changes in behavior and evens out the field for cleaner energy supplies.